Last time, the Algebra Wall was in the infant stages. It is now a real live thing, and here's the mess that got us here.

In summary, I wanted the students to build a large display piece showing examples from all the topics we have covered this year. I drafted a long list of pieces, assigned responsibilities, and let them work. We discussed locations, took a long time to make sure everything was neat and tidy, and wound up with something cool to show the school.

Here's our chosen location:

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Here's a few shots of construction. Students were assigned problems on a Tuesday. Their first task was to draft up a copy of the work necessary to complete their task. Then after conferring with each other or me, they produced panel worthy versions of the work.

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We have longer periods on Wednesday, so the 90 some minutes that day saw lots of progress. Friday some items started to appear and the panel organizers started kicking out titles and organizing work. We would've completed it the following Monday but some state testing took kids out here and there, so Tuesday we were done. Tuesday afternoon a couple kids helped me hang it in the hallway. I used some command strip velcro picture hangers and overdid it. No one should be able to casually yank these off the wall.

The final display (click for bigger):

Fun process. It was a big everyone working together moment. Something that helps solidify math class as your math family. A couple kids speculated that working all the problems involved would make one heck of a final exam. In essence, this was like a final review, though it's just now April. Their seven months of iPad and desmos experience really showed here. Only once or twice did I have to reject a graph because it wasn't scaled properly or hard to read. At no point was I diagnosing any technical concerns. I'm open to adding some extra features towards the end of the year. A big long line of circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas underneath could look good.

Kids knocked it out of the park.

Posted
AuthorJonathan Claydon