Wendy was looking for help on assessment the other day:

My thoughts on assessing in Calculus are ever changing. I attempted to adapt it to two-attempt SBG with a colleague, it didn't work super great. Then we tried an SBG-ish hybrid system. Then I went A/B/Not Yet, and now their assessments are graded on an A/B/Not Yet scale but I don't do a lot of the grading.

Gradebook

For the purposes of reporting, I keep track of grades. The assessments are about once a week, sometimes longer. It takes a while to cover enough unique material in Calculus for it to be worth assessing, part of the reason double SBG clunked. Each one has two or three sections. These assessments are purely for mechanical stuff. I cover all the phrasing and conceptual stuff through AP style benchmarks. These sections are recorded individually and students can earn an A (95), B (85), or Not Yet (0 or 50). All the sections added together are worth 50% of the grade. I shoot for 5 or 6 in a grading period (six weeks).

Practice

Early on I realized that little grades like this are a big pile of whatever. Since there are two and a half topics in Calculus we are constantly addressing the same things over and over, just refining our applications of them. We don't really have the full picture until April. I use these graded assessments as little checks along the way. What are we doing well? What could we do differently? What topics can students comfortably explain to one another?

The explanation part is what I want to get at. I incorporate a lot more discussion into assessment this year. We've done 5 so far and in each cases the students had a period of time where they could talk to each other about the task at hand. Sometimes the entire time, sometimes for only a few minutes. Then we'd discuss. Then I'd force them to go back and look at everything until they had a decent idea. No leaving questions blank or giving up. You aren't allowed to declare intellectual bankruptcy.

Grading is done by the students. I give them access to an answer key and they spent part of their time sifting through it. I ask for honesty in their ratings and I think for the most part I get it. Some students will ask for my opinion of their work before committing to a rating.

This is a time consuming process, a reason I minimize these assessments and stop doing them altogether at the end of January. Planning an assessment that is comprehensive, challenging, and completable in the time allotted is hard enough. Accounting for 10-15 minutes of discussion and 10-15 minutes of grading is equally difficult.

If you have a goal of assessing once a week or moving through a very long list of topics (like the way I do Pre-Cal), you will find this method rough. If you have a class that is pretty focused in scope and you have some flexibility in your time table, give it a shot.

The discussions are fascinating to listen to.

Posted
AuthorJonathan Claydon