Here's a little reverse jinx I pulled:

I say reverse jinx because as Februarys go, this one wasn't too bad. Normally I have an increased work load from being soccer season, the push towards AP Exams, and it's all compounded by abysmal weather. With an absolute lack of winter around here, the work load felt a little more tolerable.

While it appears I've been pretty quiet, I have a lot going on:

Math Department

In October Varsity Math made a splash by taking over a blank wall in the hallway. It now features current class photos and our Hall of Fame. With a load of painting supplies on hand, I turned my attention to an old feature of our math department office.

It dates from the 80s, maybe? I took my painters and we're turning it into a unit circle:

A slow process (we have about 1 hour/week), but soon to be completed.

Summer Camp

It's almost time to start thinking about things for Varsity Math Summer Camp. Despite the random nature of the topics (from my point of view), all the kids consistently said they enjoyed themselves. One of them even made use of some things we talked about to work on a physics lab this year. I've done the initial advertisements to Pre-Cal students, and several are already convinced this is the thing for them. For $20 it's a pretty good deal.

Focus is the goal. Fewer topics and more time. I have a better idea of what you can accomplish in a 2.5 hour session now.

Pre-Calculus

A big change is I have access to Chromebooks this year, making spreadsheets a more realistic tool at my disposal. I learned in Summer Camp that there's a real desire by kids to wrap their heads around spreadsheets. Most having no idea of all the math stuff you can do with them. Both Vectors and Polar Coordinates can make use of these. Recently we've walked through combining vector components and finding magnitudes and directions. A spreadsheet can do this quite nicely:

We jump over to Desmos, and with the help of super slick things like auto-connecting points and labels, we can quickly render our interaction:

It's almost time for the 6th Sidewalk Chalk Day. There's a possibility Calculus will get involved, allowing us to cover a truly massive amount of sidewalk.

Sidewalk Chalk means it's time for polar coordinates, a unit I started teaching after Vectors because so many of the concepts and math are identical. Traditionally I start polar coordinates with some hand calculation and plotting of points:

But computers are so much better at these things. Can we teach a computer to calculate polar coordinates? Let's used what we learned from vectors to speed up the process:

And thanks to the super bananas awesome data table pasting, we can get something far more sophisticated than our markers could accomplish:

Very excited to see how this goes.

Calculus

Ugh, I don't know where to start here. It's time to register for the AP Exam, and as part of my five year plan, I said I wanted 80% (54 students) to register for the exam and have 30% pass. Well, determined to avoid the absolute fake out that happened to me last year (I had data to suggest that many many students would do well, it was wrong), I have tweaked the process. And well, ugh. But at the same time there are positives.

First, I learned I have a solid 20 kids who don't seem to have learned anything. It's late February. How did this happen? How much of that is my responsibility? At the same time, I have 25 who seemed to have learned everything. I'll spare you the details of my benchmarking calculations (the older a benchmark, the less it's weighted in a student's rating), but the data identified 8 highly proficient students last year. Using more difficult assignments, that same method has identified 16 individuals this year, with a higher average than the previous 8.

While there was a lot wrong about my methods last year, those top 8 all registered a 2+ on the exam. To have doubled that group is a positive.

The real disheartening thing is at the other end of the spectrum. 16 nailed it, another 9 did alright, and the remaining 55 are just wandering in the wilderness.

I have to make some hard decisions about what happens next and what is best for each student. My first year of teaching Calculus taught me that allowing kids to leave knowing nothing is a disservice. But slowing everyone down is a similar disservice.

Calculus BC

We identified 16 individuals willing to start the first full Calculus BC course in the history of my school. They're excited. I'm excited.

Classroom

Lastly, in 3-4 weeks I'm getting all new furniture. It will be a bit more flexible than what I have now but will still let me establishing the grouping methods I have come to like. More on that when it arrives.

Posted
AuthorJonathan Claydon