Since starting work at my school, we have been experiencing a population boom. We had roughly 1700 kids back then, and the biggest class I taught was 25. Most were less than 20. Slowly, steadily, and surely those numbers rose and rose and rose until I was serving up hot and fresh math to 36 people at a time.

I had to make a big investment in restructuring my room, finding ways to get more kids to be able to see what we were talking about, and incorporate a lot of creative classroom management strategies. For years this worked and it worked well.

And now, just like that...

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The dropoff is...dramatic. What happened?

School within a School

Seven years ago our school district launched an initiative with KIPP and YES Prep public schools to incorporate charter programs within established school buildings. One middle school would house a 5-8 KIPP program, another a 6-8 YES Prep program. When students entered high school, they enroll in a 9-12 YES Prep program housed within our building. Because it is a charter, spots are awarded by lottery and the high school caps at roughly 1000 students. It was billed as a way to provide school choice to parents but to keep people invested in their local school. Students living outside or inside our district are eligible to apply for the lottery. Increased preference is given to in-district students. Roughly 95% of the students enrolled in this charter are students who would attend our schools anyway.

For the local schools it keeps the community involved and keeps people from moving away. For the charter, it gives access to extracurricular programs that aren't usually offered at stand alone charters (full range of athletic teams, fine arts, etc).

This year is the first time students in this charter program enter the 12th grade. We have 2700 students total, only 1700 of them non-charter.

This is not a debate on whether or not this was a wise decision or if that decision has actually improved anything. It is a program that exists in my building. They have their own teaching staff. As a result, there are fewer kids for people in my half of the building to teach in the first place.

Specializing

Part of this I did to myself. In those increasing years I was teaching more general access classes, on level Algebra 2 and Pre-Cal. Significantly more students take those classes. I stumbled into Calculus, which is generally accessible for fewer students. Then we added BC Calculus into the mix, a class with even fewer students able to take it. Simultaneously a couple years ago we started a discussion about better math options for seniors. At the time we had Pre-Cal or an AP math. There is a subset of students who could be better served. I volunteered to revive Algebra 3, a class we give to students who have ahd Algebra 2, are currently only 50/50 for going to college (and even though most likely community college), and who could use another year of reinforcement with algebra concepts. Students take this instead of Pre-Cal. When it was conceived I thought the population was about 30-40 kids. This year there are only 15 students enrolled.

Stats

Our Statistics program has had some ups and downs, enrollment wise. One year it didn't even make, then bounced back to about 40 kids, bottoming out last year with only 10 kids. To breathe some life into the course, we started improving our messaging. Students in Algebra 2 were unaware that AP classes were available to them. We printed up some Varsity Math flyers and gave kids more information about what they could be doing senior year. That messaging worked, with 30 stats students this year. Calculus should never be the class everyone takes. A healthy stats program is a healthy math department.

Adjustments

What's all that mean? Time for the great downsizing. So much of my classroom management methods will be retired. It's like I'm starting over. An increased ability to give students my attention will be welcome though. Last year I had two sections of Algebra 3 (17 and 15) and I got an incredible amount of face time with those kids because there just weren't a lot of them. 

Posted
AuthorJonathan Claydon